Homelessness: The issue of the filthy rich and relationally poor

I am getting sick of television.

There is such shallowness to so much viewing; whether is programs about cooking, rebuilding houses or artificial, highly scripted and formulaic reality shows. It’s generally banal entertainment. 

Then like a breath of fresh air comes last week’s SBS’s three part series “Filthy rich and homeless”. I found it challenging, confronting, informative and inspiring. The basic plot was taking five wealthy people from highly privileged backgrounds and taking away their phones, bank cards and money and making them homeless for ten days. As I watched each night, my admiration grew for each them. It takes a lot of guts to live on the streets or in homeless shelters when the only deprivation in life you have experienced is a cold latte or the battery on your mobile has run out. One of the five had never even made a coffee for themselves, another had never used a washing machine or made their own bed, such was their position of privilege. To be put out on the streets, penniless, lonely and homeless on ten wet and cold winter’s nights in Melbourne was more than a culture shock; it was a life changing experience. The purpose of the experiment was to show the realities that tens of thousands of homeless people face every day around Australia.

It started me thinking about how I approach the homeless on the streets of Perth. I must confess I struggle, really struggle. According to Homelessness Australia, there are 9,595 people are experiencing homelessness in Western Australia

Part of me wants to just look the other way, shades of the priest on the road to Jericho in the story Jesus told of the Good Samaritan; the priest avoided the bashed up man lying on the roadside, his head and heart space were somewhere else. Part of me thinks maybe the homeless are lazy and demotivated and so giving money doesn’t help.

I am reminded that on the streets of Calcutta, Mother Teresa told her workers never to give beggars money. But this is not Calcutta, it’s Perth or in the case of the SBS series, Melbourne.  A few dollars would help buy food or a bed for a night. Part of me feels ashamed that somehow I have never really taken on board a love for homeless people despite trying to live by the Jesus mantra of loving your neighbour as yourself.

There are so many ways to help, but where do we start? One practical way you can help the homeless is by assisting organisations that provide key services for homeless people. UnitingCare West for example is holding their 2017 Winter Appeal to raise $150, 000 to open Tranby Centre on the weekends for services to homeless people, as most centres for the homeless close on Saturdays. 

This mini-series pushed me to re-examine my prejudices and hidden fears. I am mindful that Christians believe that it is possible to see Christ in the face of the poor. Instead I have tended to see someone on the streets as someone to be disengaged from.

Maybe I am part Christian, part Pharisee. The SBS series helped me see that the problem of homelessness requires a multiplicity of responses. There is the response of the individual, with kindness, compassion and practical care. There are the wider responses of local Councils, State and Federal governments. There is a great need for more funds for homeless housing, safe shelters and financial support.  

We spend billions on sporting stadiums but too little on those who are on the margins, the homeless.

There is the deeper need to respond to domestic violence and family breakdown that often leads to someone leaving a dysfunctional family and ending up on the street. We need preventative strategies as well as emergency care. There are drug addiction issues and mental health concerns that our society is struggling to deal with.

In summary the challenge of homelessness is massive. As a wealthy nation we need to do much better. I am so grateful that the SBS series has opened up the conversation and pushed many of us to confront what we would prefer to ignore. Some times when I am facing a moral challenge I ask myself, what would Jesus do? I think I know the answer and it deeply challenges me.

 

May the love of Christ disturb us all.

Steve Francis
Moderator